Cognitive Flexibility in Children with and without Speech.

Cognitive flexibility and speech disorder 253 In Broomfield and Dodd’s (2004) incidence study, 320 children with speech difficulties were assessed: 12.5% had an articulation disorder which is an.

Speech disorder may, however, be associated with cognitive deficits considered core abilities in executive function: rule abstraction and cognitive flexibility. The study compares the rule abstraction and cognitive flexibility of children with speech disorder and typically developing controls. Three groups of five-year-old children (typically.


Cognitive Flexibility Children Without Speech Disorder

Decision making tree for children with speech sound disorder (SSD) Decision making tree for speech sound disorder version 5.1 September 2019 If you use this Decision Making Tree please credit Dr Helen Stringer, Newcastle University, with authorship.

Cognitive Flexibility Children Without Speech Disorder

Exploring cognitive flexibility in this clinical population can clarify how aspects of attention switching interact with vulnerable capacities in other areas of development (e.g., motor speech incoordination) and influence the development and maintenance of stuttering. 1.1. Measuring cognitive flexibility.

Cognitive Flexibility Children Without Speech Disorder

Definitions. Cognitive flexibility can be seen from a variety of viewpoints. A synthesized research definition of cognitive flexibility is a switch in thinking, whether that is specifically based on a switch in rules or broadly based on a need to switch one's previous beliefs or thoughts to new situations.

 

Cognitive Flexibility Children Without Speech Disorder

Cognitive flexibility in autism spectrum disorder: Explaining the inconsistencies?. This is consistent with our predictions and indicates cognitive flexibility impairments in children with ASD. In addition, there was no group difference in the number of practice trials needed to complete the practice block, implying that both groups understood the task instructions and were equally able to.

Cognitive Flexibility Children Without Speech Disorder

Youth with bipolar disorder (BD) show behavioral and neural deficits in cognitive flexibility; however, whether such deficits exist among youths at risk for BD has not been explored.The current fMRI study examined the neural basis of cognitive flexibility.

Cognitive Flexibility Children Without Speech Disorder

When focusing on the improvement of cognitive flexibility among children with autism, researchers and therapists must consider not only the deficits related to autism but also the fact that the choice of strategies for improving flexible cognition must take the level of children’s development into account.

Cognitive Flexibility Children Without Speech Disorder

Significant associations with perseverative errors were seen for physical abuse and physical neglect among the CTQ subscales. The results suggest both physical abuse and physical neglect are associated with diminished cognitive flexibility in adolescents. These effects were detected in adolescents without identified psychiatric diagnoses.

 

Cognitive Flexibility Children Without Speech Disorder

Cognitive flexibility, the ability to flexibly switch between tasks, is a core dimension of executive functions (EFs) allowing to control actions and to adapt flexibly to changing environments. It supports the management of multiple tasks, the development of novel, adaptive behavior and is associated with various life outcomes. Cognitive flexibility develops rapidly in preschool and.

Cognitive Flexibility Children Without Speech Disorder

Current Research in EF disorders in children. Research in EF disorders was initiated primarily in the area of Specific Language Impairment (SLI). Several researchers have studied executive functions in children with ASD, ADHD, William’s syndrome, Down syndrome, as well as deaf children. Some of these studies are illustrated in Figure 3.

Cognitive Flexibility Children Without Speech Disorder

The next analysis found that after controlling for child age, gender, and Y1 ToM at the first step, as hypothesized, Y1 cognitive flexibility significantly predicted Y2 ToM scores (see Regression 1, Table 4).Consistent with the mediation hypothesis Y1 ToM did not significantly predict Y2 cognitive flexibility after controlling for Y1 cognitive flexibility (see Regression 1, Table 5).

Cognitive Flexibility Children Without Speech Disorder

How are cognitive-communication disorders diagnosed? Most children with communication disorders are first referred for speech and language evaluations when their delays in communicating are noted. A child psychiatrist is usually consulted, especially when emotional or behavioral problems are also present. A comprehensive evaluation also.

 


Cognitive Flexibility in Children with and without Speech.

Children were then asked to select a different pair of cards that matched on another dimension (selection 2: flexibility). The children with consistent atypical speech disorder performed worse than the other two groups on selections 1 and 2. The children with an inconsistent speech disorder performed similarly to their typically developing.

But to fully understand exactly how C8 Sciences has achieved this feat, it is necessary to first go back to the basics about executive function, the defining elements of “cognitive flexibility” and how all of this has a great deal to do with children suffering with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.

Abstract. Greater understanding of cognitive function in children and adolescents with bipolar disorder (BD) is of critical importance to improve our ability to design targeted treatments to help with real-world impairment, including academic performance.

Cognitive Flexibility in Preschool Children with and without Stuttering Disorders Conclusions Group differences in performance suggest that early stuttering may be associated with difficulty shifting attention efficiently and greater concern about errors.

Introduction. Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is characterized by a triad of symptoms of inattention, hyperactivity and impulsivity. 1 The disorder is highly heritable and affects around 3-5% of school-aged children. 2,3 In recent decades, the cognitive problems of ADHD have been widely studied. Cognition can be defined as gaining knowledge and comprehension, including thinking.

Social communication disorder (SCD) is characterized primarily by impairment in what is called pragmatics—the area of linguistics that has to do with how meaning is created and interpreted in verbal and nonverbal interactions. Children with this disorder are not impaired in understanding word structure or grammar, or in general cognitive.